whiendeysbabyAnimal Welfare Act 1992
Animal Welfare Regulation 2001
Animal Welfare Standards-Codes of Practice
Domestic Animals Act 2000
Domestic Animals Regulation 2001

 

Compiled from the Domestic Animals Act 2000
Unregistered dogs

A person must not keep an unregistered dog. This does not apply if the dog is under 56 days old; or the dog has been kept by the person for less than 28 days; or the person has been resident in the ACT for less than 28 days.

A person must not keep a registered dog of which the person is not the registered keeper unless the registered keeper is unable to care for the dog and the person is caring for the dog on a temporary basis.

Tag offences

A keeper or carer is not to have a registered dog on private premises (other than premises occupied by the keeper or carer) if the dog is not wearing its registration tag or another tag that shows its registration number unless it is on the advice of a veterinary surgeon given for the dog’s health or welfare; or in circumstances approved, in writing, by the registrar.

A keeper or carer of a registered dog must not be in a public place with the dog if the dog is not wearing its registration tag or another tag that shows its registration number unless it is on the advice of a veterinary surgeon given for the dog’s health or welfare; or in circumstances approved, in writing, by the registrar.

A dog must not be in a public place or on private premises (other than premises occupied by the keeper) if is not with a carer; and is not wearing its registration tag or another tag that shows its registration number unless it is on the advice of a veterinary surgeon given for the dog’s health or welfare; or in circumstances approved, in writing, by the registrar.

A person must not take off a dog the dog’s registration tag, or another tag that shows the dog’s registration number, if the person does not have the consent of the dog’s keeper.

The keeper of a dog must not allow the dog to wear a registration tag that was not issued for the dog; or another tag that purports to show the dog’s registration number if the number is not the dog’s registration number.

Change of address

If the address of a registered keeper changes, the keeper must tell the registrar, in writing, of the new address within 14 days beginning the day after the change.

If the address where a registered dog is kept changes, the registered keeper must give the registrar a written notice stating the new address within 14 days beginning the day after the change.

Requirement to be licensed

A person must not, other than in accordance with a multiple dog licence, keep 4 or more dogs on 1 residential premises. This does not apply to a dog under 84 days old; or a dog kept by the person for less than 28 days; or a person resident in the ACT for less than 28 days; or a dog that is an assistance animal; or a dog kept on land that is under a lease granted for agricultural or grazing purposes; or a dog kept on land that is under a lease that allows for an animal care facility.

Dogs and cats to be de-sexed if over certain age

A person must not keep a cat or a dog that has not been de-sexed if the person does not hold a permit for the dog. This section does not apply in relation to a dog that is less than 6 months old or a cat that is less than 3 months old; or a dog or cat born before 21 June 2001. It is a defence if the defendant proves that it is less than 28 days since the day the dog or cat first came into the defendant’s possession or the defendant proves that the defendant carries on the business of offering dogs or cats for sale by retail and is keeping the dog or cat for the purpose of offering it for sale.

Sale of older dogs and cats to be notified if not de-sexed

A person commits an offence if the person sells a dog or cat that has not been de-sexed; and the person believes, or ought reasonably to believe, that-in the case of a dog-the dog is 6 months old or older; or in the case of a cat-the cat is 3 months old or older; and the person does not, within 3 working days after the day the person sells the dog or cat, tell the registrar in writing the name and address of the buyer.

Earmarkings

A veterinary surgeon must not, without reasonable excuse, de-sex a dog or cat unless the veterinary surgeon marks an ear of the dog or cat with a tattoo.

Declaration of cat curfew

If the Minister is satisfied that cats in an area are a serious threat to native flora or fauna in the area, the Minister may declare the area to be an area where cats must be confined to their keeper’s or carer’s premises at all times or during stated times.

Cats in breach of cat curfew

A cat’s keeper or carer commits an offence if the cat is in an area that the Minister has declared to be an area where cats must be confined to their keeper’s or carer’s premises at all times or during stated times and the cat is not confined to the premises of a keeper or carer during a time that the declaration is in force. This does not apply if the keeper or carer has a reasonable excuse.

Identification of dogs and cats-requirement

A person commits an offence if the person keeps a dog or cat and the dog or cat is required to be identified and the dog or cat is not identified as required.

A person commits an offence if the person sells a dog or cat and the dog or cat, after the sale, is required to be identified and the dog or cat is not identified as required.

Multiple cat licences-requirement to be licensed

A person commits an offence if the person keeps 4 or more cats on 1 residential premises and the person does not hold a multiple cat licence to keep the cats on the premises. This does not apply to a cat less than 84 days old; or a cat kept by the person for less than 28 days; or a person resident in the ACT for less than 28 days; or a cat that is an assistance animal; or a cat kept on land that is under a lease that allows for an animal care facility.

Seizure of cats

An authorised person may seize a cat if the cat is in an area for which the Minister has declared to be an area where cats must be confined to their keeper’s or carer’s premises at all times or during stated times and the cat is not confined to the premises of a keeper or carer during a time that the declaration is in force.

An authorised person may also seize a cat if the authorised person reasonably believes that the cat is required to be identified and the cat is not identified.

Removal of faeces

The carer of a dog must hygienically dispose of any faeces dropped by the dog in a public place or in a stormwater drain or channel (whether on public or private land).

The carer of a dog must not take the dog into a public place or a stormwater drain or channel (whether on public or private land) unless the carer carries equipment suitable for the hygienic disposal of faeces dropped by the dog.

Female dogs on heat

A keeper or carer of a female dog must not, without reasonable excuse, allow the dog to enter or remain in a public place if the dog is on heat. This does not apply if the dog is confined in a motor vehicle in a public place; or under the control of the keeper or carer and taking part in a dog show, field trial or obedience trial; or a dramatic performance or other entertainment.

Prohibited places

A person must not take a dog into the grounds of a child-care centre, preschool or primary school unless a keeper of the dog resides in the grounds; or the dog is taken into the grounds with the permission of the principal or person in charge of the child-care centre, preschool or primary school.

A person must not take a dog into the grounds of a high school or secondary college during school hours or when school sport, including sport training, is being conducted unless a keeper of the dog resides in the grounds; or the dog is taken into the grounds with the permission of the principal or person in charge of the high school or secondary college.

A person must not take a dog onto a field or playing area where sport is being played or training for sport is being conducted.

A person must not take a dog into a public place that is within 10m of anything designed for play by children in the public place if children are playing on it; or a fireplace or heating appliance in the public place designed for cooking food; or a swimming area as defined by a sign erected, placed or displayed.

Dogs in public places to be restrained

A keeper or carer must not be in a public place with a dog that is not restrained by a leash, unless the person is in an area designated as an area where dogs are not required to be restrained by a leash. This does not apply to a dog that is under the control of a person and is in a declared exercise area; or a working dog working livestock; or a dog taking part in a dog show, field trial or obedience trial; or a dramatic performance or other entertainment.

The keeper of a dog commits an offence if the dog is in a public place; and is not with a carer. This does not apply to a dog that is under the control of a person and is in a declared exercise area; or a working dog working livestock; or a dog taking part in a dog show, field trial or obedience trial; or a dramatic performance or other entertainment.

Dogs on private premises to be restrained

The keeper or carer must not be on private premises with a dog that is not restrained by a leash unless the person has the consent of the occupier of the premises. This does not apply if the carer is on premises occupied by the keeper or carer of the dog.

Offences of attacking or harassing

A carer with a dog must not, without reasonable excuse, allow the dog to attack or harass a person or animal.

The keeper of a dog commits an offence if the dog attacks or harasses a person or animal when it is not with a carer. It is a defence if the defendant establishes that the person or animal provoked the dog; or the person or animal was attacked or harassed because the dog came to the aid of its keeper, or another person or animal that the dog could reasonably be expected to protect; or if the attack or harassment was on premises occupied by the defendant, the defendant establishes that the person was on the premises without reasonable excuse; or the person failed to take reasonable care for the person’s own safety.

Encouraging dogs to attack or harass

A person must not, without reasonable excuse, knowingly encourage a dog to attack or harass someone else or an animal. This does not apply if the defendant reasonably believed the animal to be vermin; and the defendant was on the land with the lessee’s consent.

 

Compiled from the Animal Welfare Act 1992
Transport of dogs

A person is not to carry a dog in or on a moving vehicle on a road or road related area if the dog is not restrained or enclosed in a way that would prevent the dog from falling or jumping from the vehicle. This does not apply to a dog not being used to work livestock.

Steel-jawed traps and prohibited traps

A person is not to set a steel-jawed trap or glue trap or metal-toothed rodent trap with the intention of catching an animal and a person is not to possess a steel-jawed trap or glue trap or metal-toothed rodent trap except where the possession of a trap kept only for the purpose of display or as a curio or part of a collection.

Restricted traps

A person commits an offence if the person sets a restricted trap with the intention of catching an animal without holding a trapping permit.