whiendeysnelsonnchooks (1)Animal Welfare Act 1985
Animal Welfare Codes of Practice
Animal Welfare Regulations 2012
Codes of Practice for the Humane Destruction of Wildlife
Dog and Cat Management Act 1995
Impounding Act 1920
Livestock Act 1997
Livestock Regulations 1998

Compiled from the Dog and Cat Management Act 1995

Dogs must be registered

Every dog of or over 3 months of age must be registered. This does not apply if less than 14 days has elapsed since the person first owned or became responsible for the control of the dog; or the dog is travelling with the person; and is not usually kept within the State; and is registered under a corresponding law or is usually kept outside Australia (but a person may not rely on this exception unless he or she has produced, at the request of a dog management officer, satisfactory evidence of the matters specified in this subparagraph); or the person is responsible for the control of the dog only by reason of the dog being temporarily boarded at a boarding kennel approved by the council in whose area the kennel is situated. This also does not apply to a dog that has not been kept in any one area for more than 14 days in aggregate; or to a dog while held in the custody of-the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (South Australia) Incorporated ; or the Animal Welfare League of South Australia, Incorporated ; or the Guide Dogs Association of South Australia & Northern Territory (Inc.) ; or the Lions Hearing Dogs Incorporated ; or a member of the police force acting in that capacity; or a registered veterinary surgeon acting in that capacity; or a person acting under this Act or any other Act; or a body, or a person, or a body or person of a class, specified by regulation.

Transfer of ownership of dog

If ownership of a dog is transferred from the person in whose name the dog is individually registered, the person must give to the new owner the certificate of registration and registration disc last issued in respect of the dog.

Dog to be properly identified

If a dog is not identified as prescribed by the regulations, the person who owns or is responsible for control of the dog is guilty of an offence.

Dogs not to be allowed to wander at large

A person who owns or is responsible for the control of a dog is guilty of an offence if the dog is wandering at large.

Dog wandering at large

A dog will be taken to be wandering at large while the dog is in a public place (other than a park) or a private place without the consent of the occupier, and no person is exercising effective control of the dog by means of physical restraint; or the dog is in a park and no person is exercising effective control of the dog either by means of physical restraint; or by command, the dog being in close proximity to the person and the person being able to see the dog at all times. A dog will not be taken to be wandering at large while the dog is being used in the droving or tending of stock or is going to or returning from a place where it will be, or has been, so used; or the dog is being trained for, or participating in, an organised activity being a race, trial, class or show or in retrieving, hunting or other sporting exercise customarily involving the running of one or more dogs; or the dog is in a vehicle.

Meaning of effective control of dog by means of physical restraint

A person is exercising “effective control” of a dog by means of physical restraint if the person is exercising effective control of the dog by means of a chain, cord or leash that does not exceed 2 metres in length restraining the dog; or the person has effectively secured the dog by placing it in a cage, vehicle or other object or structure; or by tethering it to a fixed object by means of a chain, cord or leash that does not exceed 2 metres in length.

Dogs not to be allowed to attack etc

A person who sets on or urges a dog to attack, harass or chase a person or an animal or bird owned by or in the charge of another person is guilty of an offence (whether or not actual injury is caused). This does not apply if it is proved that the dog was at the time of the offence being genuinely used in the reasonable defence of a person or property, or for droving or removing an animal found trespassing.

A person who owns or is responsible for the control of a dog is guilty of an offence if the dog attacks, harasses or chases or otherwise endangers the health of a person or an animal or bird owned by or in the charge of another person (whether or not actual injury is caused). This does not apply if it is proved that the dog was at the time of the offence being genuinely used in the reasonable defence of a person or property, or for droving or removing an animal found trespassing.

Transporting unrestrained dogs in vehicles

If a dog is not physically restrained while being transported in the open tray of a utility, truck or other similar vehicle, the driver of the vehicle is guilty of an offence. This does not apply to the transport of an accredited guide dog; or a dog that is being used in the droving or tending of stock or is going to or returning from a place where it will be, or has been, so used.

A person who owns or is responsible for the control of a dog is guilty of an offence if the dog (not being an accredited disability dog, guide dog or hearing dog) is in a shop, not being a pet shop, grooming parlour or premises used for the purposes of the practice of a registered veterinary surgeon, without the permission of the shopkeeper.

A person who owns or is responsible for the control of a dog is guilty of an offence if the dog rushes at or chases a vehicle (other than on premises of which the person is the occupier).

A person who owns or is responsible for the control of a dog (not being an accredited guide dog) is guilty of an offence if the dog defecates in a public place and the person responsible for the control of the dog does not immediately remove the faeces and dispose of them in a lawful and suitable manner.

Power to protect persons or property from dogs

A person may lawfully injure or destroy a dog if that action is reasonable and necessary for the protection of life or property.

If a dog, unaccompanied by a person, is found in an enclosed paddock or other enclosed place in which an animal that is being farmed is confined, the owner or occupier of the place, or a person acting under the authority of the owner or occupier, may lawfully injure or destroy the dog.

A warden under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 , or a dog management officer, who finds a dog attacking or harassing a protected animal within the meaning of that Act on a reserve within the meaning of that Act may lawfully injure or destroy the dog if there is no other way of protecting the animal.

A person who injures or destroys a dog in circumstances referred to in this section must, as soon as practicable inform a member of the police force; and inform the council of the area in which the dog was injured or destroyed; and take reasonable steps to inform a person who owns or is responsible for the control of the dog.

Reserves and wilderness

A warden under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 , or a person authorised for the purpose by a warden, may lawfully seize, detain, destroy or otherwise dispose of any cat found in a reserve within the meaning of that Act.

A warden under the Wilderness Protection Act 1992 , or a person authorised for the purpose by a warden, may lawfully seize, detain, destroy or otherwise dispose of any cat found in a wilderness protection area or zone constituted under that Act.

Sanctuaries and other designated areas

The owner or occupier of land in a sanctuary under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 or in an area designated under this section, or a person authorised for the purpose by the owner or occupier, may lawfully seize, detain, destroy or otherwise dispose of any cat found in the sanctuary or designated area.

Remote areas

A person may lawfully seize, detain, destroy or otherwise dispose of any cat found in a place that is more than one kilometre from any place genuinely used as a place of residence.

Notification to owner of identified cat

A person who seizes, detains, destroys or disposes of an identified cat under this Division must, as soon as practicable, take reasonable steps to inform the owner of the cat of the action taken.

 

Compiled from the Animal Welfare Act 1985

Duty of person in charge of vehicle in case of accidents involving animals

Where an animal is injured in an accident involving a vehicle, the person in charge of the vehicle must take such steps as are reasonably practicable in the circumstances to inform the owner of the animal that the animal was injured; and where, after taking such steps, that person has been unable to contact the owner-inform an inspector, within 24 hours of the accident occurring, of the circumstances of the accident.

 

Compiled from the Code of Practice for the Care and Management of Animals in the Pet Trade

Cage design

All surfaces of cages, containers or pens must be made of non-toxic materials that can be cleaned and disinfected effectively.

The surrounds of all cages must be regularly cleaned to minimise dirt, animal litter and faeces.

Cage sizes

Animals kept either in groups or individual confinement must have space to feed, sleep, sit, stand, lie with limbs extended, stretch and move about.

Special provision must be made to prevent the young of any species being overlain.

Not withstanding the above, dogs and puppies must be exercised according to breed and age, but for a minimum of ten minutes, at least three times daily.

Dogs and cats of any age must not be left unattended for more than sixteen hours.

Temperature

Premises in which caged animals are kept must be maintained at temperatures and humidity levels which minimise stress. The room temperature may not exceed 30 degrees Celsius and may not fall below 15 degrees Celsius.

Sale of animals in high temperatures

Animals must not be removed into the open from their controlled environment when the outside temperature exceeds 33 degrees Celsius.

Ventilation

The premises must provide adequate exchange of air to ensure that the atmosphere is constantly fresh and clean.

Caged animals must be protected from strong draughts.

Effective shelter must be provided for those animals which may be exposed to direct sunlight.

Feeding and watering equipment

Water containers must be positioned so as to minimise the risk of spillage and faecal contamination.

Disposal of wastes

Equipment must be provided to ensure the sanitary disposal of animals’ wastes, food scraps and similar materials. Cats must be provided with litter trays and the litter replaced at least once daily.

Emergency equipment

Appropriate working fire fighting equipment must be installed in animal holding areas and staff trained and practiced in its use.

Provision must be made where practical, for the swift removal of animals from the premises in the case of fire or other emergencies.

BCF fire extinguishers must not be held on the premises.

All premises must be fitted with operative smoke detectors and earth leakage safety switches. NB Warning: Some fire retardants may be toxic to animals.

Feeding procedures

All animals must be provided with freshly prepared food in sufficient quantity and frequency to ensure optimal health and growth of the individual. Puppies and kittens must be provided with fresh food at least three times daily. The diet of debilitated animals must be at the direction of a veterinary surgeon or a person of acknowledged experience in their care.

Water must be available in sufficient quantities and for sufficient time to meet the animal’s physiological needs. Food and water supplies must be kept clean and palatable.

Animals must be fed under supervision to ensure that each animal gets the required amount of food.

Hygiene

Premises in which animals are held must be maintained in a clean and hygienic condition.

All cages, containers and pens must be maintained to ensure clean and hygienic conditions and must always be cleaned and disinfected prior to the introduction of a replacement animal into individual housing.

The disinfection of all pens, containers and cages with effective and appropriate disinfectants must be carried out at least weekly.

Introduction of news animals

Puppies and kittens should not be held in isolation where any practical alternative is available.

Newly acquired litters of puppies and kittens must not be mixed with existing stock until they have been health checked by a veterinarian.

Cages, containers and pens must be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected after the removal of puppies and kittens, before placing replacement litters in them.

Disease prevention

All purchasers of any animal must be advised of its vaccination status, common diseases of the species and techniques for prevention. This information may be provided in a Fact Sheet or through a contact to a relevant enthusiast group.

No dog may be sold unless accompanied by a current vaccination certificate.

Age of animals

Unweaned animals must not be sold and may only be accepted by pet shops for subsequent sale where adequate facilities and expertise exist for their artificial feeding and care.

Puppies and kittens must not be sold until they have reached the age of 7 weeks.

All animals sold must be able to independently sustain themselves.

Management responsibilities

It is the responsibility of the Manager, or competent employee deputed by the Manager, to inspect all animals held: at frequent intervals; at least at the opening and closing of the premises to confirm the animals’ well being and to take immediate and appropriate action in cases of sickness or injury.

Dogs and cats must be inspected, fed and exercised at least once each day over weekends and public holidays. Puppies and kittens must be inspected, fed and exercised at least three times each day over weekends and public holidays.

The Manager of the premises must register an up-to-date emergency telephone number with the RSPCA and provide the after hours telephone number of a nominated veterinarian.

Containers

All animals sold must be boxed or suitably restrained to ensure their security and protection when handed or sent to the customer.

The size of containers for the transport of animals by air, road and rail is dictated by the IATA Regulations.

All animals must be provided with adequate and appropriate food and water for the journey after sale.

Containers must be sufficiently strong to withstand stacking and general handling and constructed to exclude most light, whilst not prejudicing adequate ventilation.