whiendeyscatAnimal Welfare Act 2002
Animal Welfare Codes of Practice
Animal Welfare (Commercial Poultry) Regulations 2008
Animal Welfare (General) Regulations 2003
Animal Welfare (Pig Industry) Regulations 2010
Animal Welfare (Scientific Purposes) Regulations 2003
Dog Act 1976
Dog Regulations 1976
Dog (Restricted Breeds) Regulations (No. 2) 2002
Wildlife Conservation Act 1950
Wildlife Conservation (Reptiles and Amphibians) Regulations 2002
Wildlife Conservation Regulations 1970

Compiled from the Dog Act 1976

Dogs to be registered

If a dog is not registered under this Act, the owner of the dog and the occupier of the premises where the dog is ordinarily kept or ordinarily permitted to live each commits an offence. This does not apply to a dog under the age of 3 months; a dog held in the custody of-the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Inc.) of Western Australia; the Dogs Refuge Home (W.A.) Inc.; or any other prescribed body, in a place maintained for the purpose of finding dogs suitable homes; a dog held in the custody of-a registered veterinary surgeon, or a person acting on his behalf, in the course of his professional practice; or a member of the Police Force or other person acting in pursuance of a statutory duty or in the administration of this Act; a pack of not less than 10 foxhounds bona fide kept together in kennel exclusively for the purpose of hunting, and registered as a pack in lieu of the separate registration of each hound; or a dog kept in an approved licensed kennel establishment, where the person by whom that licence is held has paid the prescribed concessional fee applicable to the registration of dogs in that establishment in lieu of a separate registration fee in respect of each such dog.

Change of ownership

Where the ownership of a dog is transferred to another person, the registered owner shall within 28 days thereafter cause the local government in whose register his name appears to be notified in the prescribed manner and form of the name and residential address of the new owner.

Dogs to wear collars, registration tags, etc

A dog shall not be in a public place unless it is wearing a collar to which a valid registration tag under section 18 relating thereto is securely attached; and the name and residential address of the owner of the dog are legibly endorsed or inscribed on, or on an attachment to, the collar worn by the dog. A dog is exempt from the requirements if it is a greyhound participating in a greyhound race or trial held under a licence issued under the Racing and Wagering Western Australia Act 2003; a foxhound exempted from separate registration; a dog exempted from separate registration under section; a dog being exhibited for show purposes; a dog which, under the control of a responsible person, is being trained for or is participating in retrieving, duck hunting or some other customary sporting purpose; or a dog that is participating in an obedience trial or classes conducted under the auspices of the body known as the Canine Association of Western Australia (Inc.) or a body approved by the local government in whose district the obedience trial or classes are conducted.

Control of dogs in certain public places

A dog shall not be in a public place unless it is held by a person who is capable of controlling the dog; or securely tethered for a temporary purpose, by means of a chain, cord, leash or harness of sufficient strength and not exceeding the prescribed length. A dog is exempt from the requirements if it is in an area specified by a local government as a dog exercise area; it is in a public place in an area of the State that is outside the metropolitan region or a townsite; it is in or on a vehicle or boat; it is being exhibited for show purposes; it is participating in an obedience trial or classes conducted under the auspices of the body known as the Canine Association of Western Australia (Inc.) or a body approved by the local government in whose district the obedience trial or classes are conducted; it is registered as being bona fide used in the droving or tending of stock and is being so used or is going to or returning from a place where it will be, or has been, so used; it is a foxhound in a registered pack bona fide engaged in hunting or hound exercise or in going to or returning from hunting or hound exercise; or it is being used for retrieving, duck hunting or other customary sporting purposes.

Control of dogs in places that are not public

A dog shall not be in any place that is not a public place unless consent to its being there has been given by the occupier or a person apparently authorised to consent on behalf of the occupier; or if the place is unoccupied, by the owner or a person apparently authorised to consent on behalf of the owner; or if the place is an enclosed field, paddock, yard or other place in which animals or birds are confined, by the owner of all such animals or birds; or it is held or tethered as required. Adog is exempt from the requirements if it is in a pet shop or premises used for the practice of a registered veterinary surgeon; or in or on a vehicle or boat.

Diseases and parasite control

The owner of a dog shall take all reasonable precautions against that dog becoming infested by tapeworms or other parasites, and if the dog appears to be suffering from any infectious or contagious disease shall cause the dog to be examined by a registered veterinary surgeon, or in the absence of a veterinary surgeon, by a medical practitioner or environmental health officer and shall take all practicable steps to enable that condition to be controlled or eradicated.

Protection of livestock

A person who owns, or who is for the time being lawfully in charge of, any animal or bird may lawfully shoot or otherwise destroy a dog which he finds attacking that animal or bird if there is no other way of stopping the attack and provided that notice is given to a police officer as soon as is practicable thereafter.

The owner or occupier of any enclosed paddock, field, yard or other place in which any horse, cattle, sheep, swine, goats or poultry (in this section referred to as livestock ) are confined, or any person acting under the authority of that owner or occupier, may lawfully shoot or otherwise destroy any dog found therein, whether the owner of the dog is or is not known, if that dog is not accompanied by some person.

Where it is reasonably necessary for the protection of livestock confined or depasturing on any land the owner or occupier of that land or a person acting under his authority may lay poison on that land in baits likely to be taken by dogs wandering at large if-the poison is not laid within 20 metres of any road, reserve or public place; the laying of that poison is authorised in the material circumstances by or under any Act relating to the prevention, destruction or eradication of specific kinds of animal or of animals in specified circumstances; and the poison is not so laid as to endanger children or indigenous birds or animals, but where the laying of poison is not found to have been reasonably necessary, or does not otherwise comply with the requirements of this subsection, a person who lays poison in baits commits an offence.

Maximum length of leash etc

The maximum length of a chain, cord or leash is 2 metres measured from the point of attachment to the collar of the dog.

 

Compiled from the Cat Act 2011

Cats to be registered

The owner of a cat that has reached 6 months of age must ensure that the cat is registered with the local government in whose district the cat is ordinarily kept. This does not apply if the cat has been kept by the person for less than 14 days; or the person has been resident in the State for less than 14 days; or the cat belongs to a class of cats prescribed as exempt from registration.

Cats to wear tags

The owner of a registered cat must ensure that when the cat is in a public place the cat is wearing its registration tag. This does not apply if the cat belongs to a class of cats prescribed as exempt from wearing registration tags when in a public place.

Registration

A local government must refuse an application for the grant or renewal of the registration of a cat if, and only if, the local government is satisfied that one or more of the following apply-the cat is not microchipped; the cat is not sterilised. A local government must not refuse an application for the grant or renewal of the registration of a cat that is not microchipped if the cat is exempt from microchipping. A local government must not refuse an application for the grant or renewal of the registration of a cat that is not sterilised if the cat is exempt from sterilisation.

Cats to be microchipped

The owner of a cat that has reached 6 months of age must ensure that the cat is microchipped, unless the cat is exempt from microchipping. A cat is exempt from microchipping if a certificate given by a veterinarian stating that the implantation of a microchip in the cat may adversely affect the health and welfare of the cat applies in respect of the cat.

Cats to be sterilised

The owner of a cat that has reached 6 months of age must ensure that the cat is sterilised by a veterinarian, unless the cat is exempt from sterilisation. A cat is exempt from sterilisation if any of the following apply in respect of the cat-a certificate given by a veterinarian stating that to sterilise the cat may adversely affect the health and welfare of the cat applies in respect of the cat; the cat is owned, for the purpose of breeding, by an approved cat breeder; the cat belongs to a class of cats prescribed as exempt from sterilisation.

Notice of sterilisation to be given to microchip database company

A veterinarian who sterilises a microchipped cat must, within 7 days after sterilising the cat, give notice in writing in the form, if any, prescribed of the sterilisation of the cat to the microchip database company for that cat.

Transfer of ownership of cats

A person must not transfer a cat that is not microchipped unless, at the time of the transfer, the person is satisfied that a certificate referred given by a veterinarian stating that the implantation of a microchip in the cat may adversely affect the health and welfare of the cat applies in respect of the cat.

A person must not transfer a cat that is not sterilised unless, at the time of the transfer the person is satisfied that a certificate given by a veterinarian stating that to sterilise the cat may adversely affect the health and welfare of the cat applies in respect of the cat; or the purchaser is an approved cat breeder and the purchaser is purchasing the cat for the purpose of breeding; or the cat belongs to a class of cats prescribed as exempt from sterilisation; or a voucher is given to the purchaser by the person to enable the purchaser to have the cat sterilised at a later date by a veterinarian at no cost to the purchaser.

Notice to be given of transfer of cat

Within 7 days after the transfer of a cat, the seller of the cat must give notice in writing to the local government with which the cat is registered, of the name and address of the purchaser of the cat; and any other changes to the information in respect of the cat; and to the microchip database company for that cat, of-the name and address of the purchaser of the cat; and any other changes to the information in respect of the cat.

Operator of cat management facility may have cat microchipped and sterilised

If the operator of a cat management facility believes on reasonable grounds that a cat kept at the facility is not microchipped, and has no reason to believe that the cat is exempt from microchipping or believes on reasonable grounds that a cat kept at the facility is not sterilised, and has no reason to believe that the cat is exempt from sterilisation, then the operator of the cat management facility may do anything necessary to ensure that the cat is microchipped or sterilised, or both, as is relevant, before the cat is reclaimed or otherwise transferred from that facility.

Only approved cat breeders may breed cats

A person must not breed cats unless the person is an approved cat breeder.

 

Compiled from the Animal Welfare (General) Regulations 2003

Inhumane devices

The following devices are prescribed as inhumane-a device, other than an electric fence, that is designed or modified to deliver an electric shock to an animal; jawed traps; spurs that have sharpened or fully-fixed rowels; spurs that are reasonably capable of penetrating the skin of the animal on which they are intended to be used.